Friday, May 31, 2019

5 Tips to Increase Fuel Economy

 Increase Fuel Economy

When budgeting for expenses, there are a lot of things that fall outside of your control. For the most part, fuel can be one of those things that’s generally “just a cost of doing business.” However, there are a lot of things you can consider to reduce, or mitigate as much as possible, fuel costs on the job. Check out these five things to consider.

Idle Time

Idling your work truck on the jobsite has become a fairly common practice, and sometimes it’s necessary. At times, things like inverters, power takeoffs, air compressors, and more require the engine to be cranking in order to work. However, don’t let the necessity to idle for those functions become a common occurrence of convenience when it isn’t needed. You’d be surprised how quickly cutting those idle minutes can add up over the span of months or years.

Vehicle Maintenance

For a glut of reasons, you should be properly maintaining your work trucks. But one added benefit to regular maintenance is increased fuel economy. Regular fluid changes, changing filters, and routine engine tune-ups keep your truck’s powerplant optimally efficient. In addition to maintaining the powertrain, properly worn and inflated tires can make a big difference in fuel efficiency.

Slim down

Do you really need to carry everything and the kitchen sink from jobsite to jobsite? You don’t, and your truck will thank you for not doing so. Loading your truck with only the tools for the job at hand reduces weight, and reduced weight is a major factor in fuel economy.

Lose the Leadfoot

Your driving habits may be the number one factor in fuel efficiency. When you drive with the intention of efficiency, it shows. While it might be a slow and steady ride, your wallet will thank you later for taking it easy on the gas pedal. Planning service calls in an efficient manner can help you save time and miles. Make sure you’re not driving cross-town multiple times when a little planning could have gone a lot further.

Right Truck, Right Job

This isn’t something you can change on the fly, but our last suggestion is the make sure you’ve got a fleet that’s appropriate for your line of work. If you’re over-specing your vehicles, you’re wasting fuel. If you’re under-specing your trucks, you’re also wasting fuel. It’s vital that you put a lot of thought into having the right class of truck, truck body, and work, trailers that allow you to do your job, and do it most efficiently.

Source:  https://www.knapheide.com/news/blog/2019/01/5-tips-to-increase-fuel-economy


Wednesday, May 29, 2019

Digit: Future of Self-Driving Vehicle Delivery | The Future of Ford and Transportation | Ford


As the popularity of online shopping continues to grow, what does delivery service look like in the future? Ford is teaming up with Agility Robotics to explore how the company’s new robot, Digit, can help get packages to your door efficiently with the help of self-driving vehicles. Not only does Digit work collaboratively with self-driving vehicles, but it can also walk up stairs and past unexpected obstacles to get packages straight to your doorstep. Learn more about Ford Motor Company’s work with Agility here: https://ford.to/2Ehu2KH Discover more The Future of Ford and Transportation videos: https://ford.to/2JWcg31

Monday, May 27, 2019

What’s The Deal With Underdeck Air Compressors?

 VMAC-DTM70-Air-Compressor

Underdeck air compressors is another name for PTO driven air compressors, a compressed air system that is powered by a vehicle’s transmission via a PTO. PTO air compressors are frequently nicknamed “underdeck” because of their mounting position, under the deck of a service truck.
Underdeck air compressors come in hydraulic and non-hydraulic varieties, giving operators options depending on their specific needs. Most hydraulic varieties are intended for service trucks with hydraulic cranes, tool circuits, and outriggers, while non-hydraulic underdeck air compressors work well for countless applications.

What are the advantages of underdeck air compressors?

Underdeck air compressors are an innovative solution for providing compressed air and have many benefits over traditional above-deck air compressors. The advantages of underdeck air compressors include:
  • Free up cargo space
  • Reduce GVW
  • 50 to 200 CFM
  • 100% duty cycle
  • Hydraulic option
  • Few moving parts
  • Less maintenance

Who makes underdeck air compressors?

There are three primary manufacturers of underdeck air compressors in North America:
Each manufacturer’s product is quite different, varying in design and system specifications. Anyone considering an underdeck system should carefully consider all of their options before making a purchase.

How much do underdeck air compressors cost?

The exact price of an underdeck air compressor will vary depending on a variety of factors, including the manufacturer, dealer mark-up, region, specific technology, and more. In addition, there are two different factors that determine the cost of any vehicle-integrated air compressor:
  • System price
  • Install price
It’s important to look at both the system price and the install price when comparing air compressor solutions. In some cases, the install time of an underdeck air compressor can save you money when compared to seemingly less expensive systems with longer install times.
Here are a couple of examples from VMAC’s product line of estimated install times for an experienced upfitter:

Estimated Install Hours For Vehicle-Integrated Systems


Ford 2018 6.7L Power Stroke V8 DieselRAM 2018 6.7L Cummins 24V Inline 6 Diesel
UNDERHOOD™ 7018-22 hrs18-24 hrs
Direct-Transmission Mounted 70 (“underdeck”)16-18 hrs16-18 hrs
DISCLAIMER ON INSTALL TIMES: Install times are based upon having pre-read the install manual, being an experienced installer, and having the tools, system and vehicle prepped for install. Times may vary plus/minus 4 hours of the suggested install times published in this document.
To get the most accurate pricing for an underdeck air compressor, we recommend reaching out to a trusted VMAC Dealer.

What else do I need to know?

The main thing you need to know is that underdeck air compressors are awesome!
But before buying one, there’s a little more research you should do. We’ve put together an extensive article on underdeck air compressors, “What Is A PTO Driven Air Compressor?”, which covers everything you need to know about these innovative systems:
  • Advantages
  • Compatible Vehicles
  • Direct-Mounted vs. Shaft Mounted
  • Fully Engineered Systems vs. Installation Kits
  • Transfer Case Design
  • Weight
  • And more
Check out our PTO Driven Air Compressor article to learn more about underdeck air compressors!

Saturday, May 25, 2019

DECKED Presents | Ultimate Storage, Maximum Function




DECKED designs and manufactures fully engineered, 100% American Made truck bed storage systems with a true 2000 lb payload and a steel subframe. The DECKED system will keep your tools and gear dry, secure and organized. #worksmarterplayharder For more info on DECKED visit https://decked.com/

Thursday, May 23, 2019

Venco Venturo Industries, LLC Electric-Hydraulic Cranes 2019 NTEA




ET6K ELECTRIC-HYDRAULIC CRANE Max. Capacity 2,000 lb - Crane Rating 6,000 ft-lb - Max. Reach 10 ft Min. Truck Size Needed (GVWR) Class 2 (8,000 lb)

 The Venturo ET6K service crane is a 6,000 ft.-lbs. crane with 2,000 lb. lifting capacity featuring electric winch, power rotation and hydraulic boom elevation with a single, manual extension up to 10 ft.

ET12KXP ELECTRIC-HYDRAULIC CRANE Max. Capacity 3,500 lb, Crane Rating 12,000 ft-lb, Max. Reach 16 ft Min. Truck Size Needed (GVWR) Class 2 (8,800 lbs GVWR)

With a 12,000 FT-LB rating and a 3,500 LB maximum capacity, the ET12KXP can be installed on trucks with a minimum Class 2 (8,800 lbs GVWR). The ET12KXP features proportional control, single-stage full-hydraulic extension and a one-piece hexagonal boom for increased strength. This new crane features a 9′ – 16′ reach.

 ET12K(X) ELECTRIC-HYDRAULIC CRANE Max. Capacity 3,500 lb - Crane Rating 12,000 ft-lb - Max. Reach 15 ft Min. Truck Size Needed (GVWR) Class 2 (8,800 lb)

The Venturo ET12KX service crane is a versatile application that is neither too large or too small for a majority of lifting jobs. This crane has been utilized heavily in municipal/public works industry lifting anything from service equipment to fire hydrants throughout the United States.

 With a 12,000 FT-LB rating and a 3,500 LB maximum capacity, the ET12KX can be installed on trucks with a minimum 8,800 GVWR.

The ET12K(X) comes in two configurations; the ET12K offers two-stage manual boom extension, and the ET12KX offers single-stage hydraulic extension with a secondary manual boom extension.

Tuesday, May 21, 2019

Modular Van Interiors From Harbor Truck Body & Van



Warren with Harbor Truck Body and Van shows off the modular van interiors bin packages available for all types of commercial vans. See more at http://www.harbortruck.com

Sunday, May 19, 2019

Transfer Flow 50 Gallon Replacement Tanks 2019 NTEA


REPLACEMENT FUEL TANKS Eliminate half your fuel stops and increase your driving range by replacing the stock fuel tank with a high-capacity Transfer Flow midship replacement fuel tank system that doesn’t sacrifice bed space or ground clearance.

Friday, May 17, 2019

Autonomy: Partnerships of sky and ground

What is likely to happen on the road to autonomous vehicles is partnerships between truck makers and tech companies.   

autonomous trucks

Sticking with the theme of disruption and transformation, nothing has the potential to be more disruption in the trucking industry than autonomous vehicles.

At a recent NationaLease meeting, guest speaker John Paul MacDuffie, professor at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, said that autonomy requires new hardware components and lots of AI software. Engineering talent will be one of the keys to its success along with the ability to get the system integration piece of the equation right. MacDuffie does not see technology firms jumping in to manufacture vehicles but rather, working on developing operating systems for autonomous vehicles.

We are already seeing incremental moves toward autonomy with some of the advanced driver assistance features that are available on trucks today. This includes things like collision mitigation and lane departure systems.

The Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) has defined six levels of autonomy from zero (no automation) to 5 (full automation). MacDuffie believes there is a big leap in getting from Level 2 autonomy to Level 3.

Level 2, or partial automation, allows steering and acceleration and deceleration to be automated “using information about the driving environment…with the exception that the human driver perform all remaining aspects of the dynamic driving task,” according to the SAE definition. The human driver is tasked with monitoring the driving environment.

In Level 3, or conditional automation, the system monitors the driving environment while the driver will respond appropriately to a request by the system to intervene.

“Level 3 automation is particularly tricky,” MacDuffie said. How to safely transfer control from the computer to the driver, particularly in emergency situations, needs to be worked out. “[There has to be a] balancing act of providing drivers with the benefits of autonomy — like not having to pay attention — while ensuring they are ready to grab the wheel if the [vehicle] encounters something it can’t handle.”

What is likely to happen on the road to autonomous vehicles, according to MacDuffie, is partnerships between truck makers and tech companies — what he calls “partnerships of ‘sky’ and ‘ground.’”
He added, “The winning combination will succeed not just in meeting customer needs/wants, but also societal goals and expectations.”

SOURCE:  https://www.fleetowner.com/ideaxchange/autonomy-partnerships-sky-and-ground?NL=FO-02&Issue=FO-02_20190516_FO-02_185&sfvc4enews=42&cl=article_4&utm_rid=CPENT000004488230&utm_campaign=24750&utm_medium=email&elq2=f9e997d742a94887aa813eec4c80d2e2

Wednesday, May 15, 2019

Gas vs. Diesel: Which To Spec

Gas vs. Diesel Blog

Today’s comprehensive selection of commercial vehicle engines offers many benefits to customers.

A myriad of choices enable customers to select the engine that best fits their application without sacrificing torque, fuel efficiency, horsepower and more.

While the vast engine choices create additional value, it can also create a dilemma when it comes to properly spec’ing the engine for the intended application of the vehicle. Purchasers may be overwhelmed by the selection and consequently choose an engine that doesn’t best fit the requirements. Over spec’ing and under spec’ing are common mistakes, leading to lost efficiency, productivity or a longer return on investment period.

Within the last few years, commercial vehicle manufacturers have vastly increased engine choices. The most notable additions have been diesel engines within several Class 1 light duty pickups and gasoline engines within Class 6 and Class 7 medium duty trucks. While gasoline engines still dominate Class 1 and diesel engines make up the majority of Class 6 and Class 7, these new engine choices make the decision much more analytical than ever before.

So how do you know which engine is right for the job? There are many factors to consider as it pertains to the engine when in the market for a new commercial vehicle.

Cost
Commercial vehicles would all be perfect if cost didn’t need to be factored into the equation.

Unfortunately, the real world operates on financial constraints so unlimited funding for your next work truck just isn’t feasible. That being said, cost is a major influencer on the selection of the commercial vehicle, especially as it relates to the engine.

Acquisition costs can be substantially higher with diesel engines, stretching from $8,000 more in light duty commercial vehicles up to $12,000* in heavy duty commercial trucks. Gasoline engines offer the advantage with significantly lower acquisition costs.

Horsepower & Torque
Selecting an engine with enough horsepower and torque is vital for success with many commercial vehicles. The most common application considered for ample horsepower and torque is pulling a trailer, regardless of size. The more weight on the trailer, the more important horsepower and torque becomes. Other applications, including hauling bulk material, should also pay close attention to the horsepower and torque ratings of an engine as these vehicles are consistently hauling the maximum available payload.

While gasoline and diesel engines have similar horsepower ratings, they are vastly different with torque. Looking at a class 3 pickup, the diesel has a slight advantage in horsepower rating yet boasts a torque rating two times that of the gas engine**. Point being, if you are towing heavy loads or your application relies upon torque to get you moving a diesel will be the better fit for you.


Fuel Efficiency
Federal regulations have forced commercial vehicle manufacturers to maximize fuel efficiency within new vehicles, regardless if they contain diesel or gasoline engines. This has caused the gap of fuel efficiency between gasoline and diesel engines to shrink. Historically, diesel engines have held the advantage of fuel efficiency over gasoline engines. Today, you can expect a slight difference between most gasoline and diesel engine choices. For instance, with a light duty Class 1 pickup you can expect to see a combined fuel efficiency rating of 20 mpg with the gasoline engine and a combined fuel efficiency rating of 23 mpg with the diesel engine***.

Commercial vehicle customers should compare the price per gallon of diesel and unleaded fuel and factor in projected annual mileage to determine overall fuel costs.

PTO Provisions
Snowplows, dumps, cranes, many different applications require a power-take-off (PTO). To avoid potential compatibility issues, ensure the engine (and transmission) you select will allow for PTO installation. Many truck manufacturers offer a “PTO prep” option, making the installation of the PTO unit more seamless for the upfitter.

At one time, your only choice for PTO compatible engines were diesels. Today, many manufacturers offer gas engines that can easily accommodate a PTO unit for auxiliary equipment.

Idle Frequency
Engine idling is common within many vocations that employ commercial vehicles to get the job done. Today, many local and state regulations are in place to discourage companies from engine idling. This has led to many product developments, including stand-alone, mobile power systems that mount on the commercial vehicle. For companies that are still allowed to idle their engines on the job, there are obvious benefits associated with diesel engines.

Diesel engines idle at a lower speed and are engineered for severe duty cycles, making them the more popular choice within high-idle applications.

Maintenance
The longer the life cycle of the vehicle, the more vital engine maintenance will become. There are many considerations to be made as it pertains to maintenance including cost of replacement parts, preventative maintenance intervals, qualified technicians, warranty coverage and more.

While diesels have longer maintenance intervals and warranty coverage, there are additional components and requirements (DEF fluid) that aren’t found on gasoline engines. Diesel replacement parts tend to be more expensive and finding qualified diesel mechanics can be a challenge in certain geographic areas.

Cost leans heavily towards gasoline while torque, engine life, fuel efficiency and idle frequency favors diesel. PTO provisions and maintenance are heavily reliant upon the application. As always, be sure to have a clear understanding of the intended application of the vehicle to help ensure you make the best selection for the job at hand.

*Comparing 2016 Ford F-250 gas(6.2L) and diesel (6.7L) pickup for light duty and 2017 Ford F-750 gas (6.8L) and diesel (6.7L) cab chassis for heavy duty, prices are MSRP from ford.com.
**Comparing 2016 3500HD pickup with Vortec 6.0L V8 gas engine rated at 360 horsepower and 380 ft-lb. of torque and Duramax 6.6L V8 diesel engine rated at 397 horsepower and 765 ft-lb. of torque
***Comparing 2016 Ram 1500 2wd with a 3.6L gas engine with 2016 Ram 1500 2wd with a 3.0L diesel engine, both models with 8 speed automatic transmission. Data obtained from National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (nhtsa.gov).

 Source:  https://www.knapheide.com/news/blog/2016/08/gas-vs-diesel-which-to-spec?utm_source=eloqua&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=nurture&utm_content=tof-2&elqTrackId=cf5c9a60cb55496db9b8a0e6320093c3&elq=b7b12e3bfdc7462185b997ff4aa710e4&elqaid=1067&elqat=1&elqCampaignId=518

Monday, May 13, 2019

The 6 1/2 FT Short Bed Service Body for Extended Cabs SWB Chassis by Harbor Truck Bodies

Many do not know, so we will let it out: Harbor Truck Bodies builds a 6.5' short bed service body for a short wheelbase extended cab and it looks great on the truck.  

Call Harbor Truck Bodies at 800-433-9452 and visit the website at www.htbi.net.

Saturday, May 11, 2019

Auto Crane


Manufacturing Marvels segment aired on Fox Business Channel ©2015 about the Auto Crane Company

Thursday, May 9, 2019

FORD COLLABORATION WITH GRAVITY SKETCH INTRODUCES CO-CREATION FEATURE, ALLOWING DESIGNERS ACROSS GLOBE TO WORK IN SAME VIRTUAL REALITY SPACE

  • Ford is the first automaker to work with Gravity Sketch – a 3D VR tool that enables designers to come up with more human-centric designs
  • Co-Creation feature in Gravity Sketch gives global designers at Ford the ability to use the same 3D virtual reality design space, improving collaborative efforts and real time decision-making when designing vehicles.
  • Co-Creation has the ability to save designers time and reduce the requirement for global travel during the development process of creating new vehicles

DEARBORN, Mich., May 6, 2019 – A designer from Shanghai and another from Dearborn step into a virtual design space together to make changes to a global vehicle design. Both walk around the 3D design, review it and make changes on the fly. Once finished, the two remove their VR headsets and return to their separate workspaces -- thousands of miles apart.

Thanks to Co-Creation, a feature developed by Gravity Sketch in collaboration with Ford, designers across the globe can create, collaborate and evaluate vehicle designs with one another in real time without leaving their physical workspace.

Ford is the first automaker to work with Gravity Sketch – a 3D virtual reality tool that enables designers to create more human-centric vehicle design. Designers trade in their sketchpads for a headset and controllers to become immersed in virtual reality, imitating gestural interactions through motion tracking that replicates sketching with pen and paper. Designers can draw, rotate, expand and compress a 3D sketch. The Co-Creation feature allows multiple designers to engage in content creation, while making these real-time adjustments.

Consumer purchasing trends differ in each global region, meaning an attractive design in one region may not be as appealing in another. Co-Creation gives designers from different regions the opportunity to come together in one space and review a 3D sketch to make important decisions earlier in the design process.

”The Co-Creation feature adds more voices to the conversation in a virtual environment, which results in more efficient design work that may help accelerate a vehicle program’s development,” says Ford Design Manager Michael Smith.

Gravity Sketch allows designers to speed the process from weeks to hours, skipping the 2D stage and working with a 3D model from the beginning. Through Co-Creation, a designer can transfer to another designer’s point of view within virtual reality to see from his or her perspective. This is especially helpful when training other designers in Gravity Sketch.

Across five global Ford design studios, dozens of interior and exterior designers are now experimenting with Gravity Sketch for workflow feasibility and its capability for real-time co-creation and collaboration. Shifting to a model that designs and evaluates in virtual reality could revolutionize the entire process by drastically reducing development time and allowing for more 3D representations in the evaluation stage.

“Our collaboration with Ford designers has enabled us to get immersed in their creative process and discover ways to help fine-tune this application to better suit their needs so they can build the best possible vehicles for their customers,” said Oluwaseyi Sosanya, Gravity Sketch CEO & Co-founder.

About Ford Motor Company
Ford Motor Company is a global company based in Dearborn, Michigan. The company designs, manufactures, markets and services a full line of Ford cars, trucks, SUVs, electrified vehicles and Lincoln luxury vehicles, provides financial services through Ford Motor Credit Company and is pursuing leadership positions in electrification, autonomous vehicles and mobility solutions. Ford employs approximately 196,000 people worldwide. For more information regarding Ford, its products and Ford Motor Credit Company, please visit www.corporate.ford.com

Tuesday, May 7, 2019

VanAir PTO Driven Underdeck Systems Walk Around Video



Understand the unique and powerful components of Vanair's PTO Driven Underdeck Air Compressor/Generator Systems, their benefits and features.

Sunday, May 5, 2019

Harbor is an Unusual Company




We confess. Our truck bodies are terrific looking. They have unusually good curb appeal! Why? Because we pay enormous attention to detail. It’s firmly rooted in our DNA to make sure that our paint finishes are and welds are without flaws and show no burn marks…even on our stainless steel lids. The curve of the taper in our rack legs matches the curve in truck roof line (called tumblehome). The wheel panel and body height match the truck frame height so precisely that you can’t look through the wheel well and see light from the other side of the body.  In fact, customers describe Harbor as “Building Beautiful Bodies”.  

But, in some respects, our California curb appeal belies an underlying quality.  In the only quality survey ever in our industry history, Harbor ranked number one (#1) in manufacturing quality and quality processes.* Maybe that’s why Harbor consistently ranks among the top volume commercial “pool” manufacturers for Ford, GM and Ram…and was ranked #1 in several years. Or why Harbor was chosen over all other US manufacturers to export US-made commercial truck bodies to the Toyota Motor Company for use by its Forklift Dealers in Japan. 

About Harbor, some competitors in our industry might claim, “Beauty’s only skin deep” or “Don’t judge a book by its cover.” We prefer, “A Picture Paints a Thousand Words.” That’s why it’s not a Harbor until we say it’s a Harbor…accomplished through blood, sweat and sheet metal.

* based on a GMC study performed by an independent automotive engineering firm.

Friday, May 3, 2019

Quick Guide To Industry Acronyms

 Quick Guide To Industry Acronyms


Understanding the many industry acronyms and terms can be overwhelming. This quick guide can get you up to speed on some of the most important terms and meanings.

GVW – Gross Vehicle Weight
This is the total weight of the truck, including all passengers, drivers, cargo, accessories, fuel, and fluid in the engine at any point in time. It is important that this measurement does not go over the GVWR, or it can be a safety hazard.

GVWR – Gross Vehicle Weight Rating
This is the maximum total vehicle weight that is safe for the truck, established by the chassis manufacturer. The weight of the truck, any cargo, and passengers including the driver, as well as any fuel and fluid in the engine is included in the rating. Chassis manufacturers will most often set the GVWR lower than the combined axle ratings (the total amount of weight an individual axle can carry). This is due to the chassis manufacturer’s internal safety standards for durability, stability, and handling, as well as SAE International test protocols.

GCWR – Gross Combined Weight Rating
Everything that moves with the vehicle is included in the GCWR. The weight of the truck, any cargo, passengers including the driver, any fluid or fuel in the truck, as well as the weight of the trailer and the trailer’s cargo is included. Exceeding the GCWR can cause a safety hazard.

Payload
The cargo carrying capacity of a vehicle is the payload. It is calculated by subtracting the vehicles’ weight including passengers and the driver from the GVWR. Exceeding the Payload capacity can cause damage to your suspension, chassis, frame, tires, and many other parts of the truck.

CA – Cab to Axle
The cab-to-axle measurement is the distance from the back of the truck cab to the center of the rear axle. Clear CA or effective CA is the distance from the rear surface of any obstruction behind the cab to the center of the rear axle. If you have a tandem axle truck, then it is measured to the midpoint between the two rear axles. This measurement can help you determine the length of the body that can be mounted on the chassis.

Wheelbase
The wheelbase is the distance between the centers of the front and rear axles. When the truck has more than two axels, it is the distance between the steering axle and the center point of the driving axle group. This can affect body installation, weight distribution, and truck performance.

SRW – Single Rear Wheel
A single rear wheel refers to a chassis that has one wheel on each side of the rear axle. Single Rear wheels make for smoother driving without cargo, as well as easier driving in cities, suburbs, and highways. These trucks are more affordable to purchase outright, and have better fuel economy. A single rear wheel has less towing capability than a dual rear wheel, and less stability when towing in windy conditions.

DRW – Dual Rear Wheel
A dual rear wheel refers to a chassis that has two wheels on each side of the rear axle. This feature is a must if you are towing large payloads, or driving through rough terrain. It adds stability to your truck which increases safety for your divers and cargo. Having a dual rear wheel will allow the driver to safely get off the road in the case of a tire blowing out. Trucks with a dual rear wheel can be difficult to maneuver in cities, where parking and tight streets can be challenging. This feature can also reduce the truck’s mpg, especially in cities, and increase maintenance costs, because there are at least two extra tires to replace or rotate.

CDL – Commercial Driver’s License
The vehicle’s GVWR is one of the factors that will effect whether the diver needs a CDL. If the truck has a GVWR, and GVW of 26,000 lbs. or lower, the driver does not need a CDL.

Class A
A Class A license is required to operate any combination of vehicles with a gross combination weight rating of 26,001 lbs. or more. This includes towing a trailer weighing over 10,000 lbs. which makes the vehicle and trailer rating over 26,001 lbs.

Class B
A Class B license is required to operate a single vehicle with a GVWR or 26,001 lbs. or more, and/or a vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 lbs. or heavier that is towing another vehicle weighting up to 10,000 lbs.

Class C
A Class C license is required if the vehicle you intend to drive does not meet the criteria for either Class A or B and it is meant to transport either: 16 or more passengers including the driver or hazardous material.

Original Source: NTEA Truck Equipment Glossary


Blog Source: https://www.knapheide.com/news/blog/2018/08/quick-guide-to-industry-acronyms

Wednesday, May 1, 2019

The Harbor Service Body with a Cargo Bed Enclosure Keeps Stuff Out-Of-Sight



This is an example of a new GMC 2500HD chassis upfitted with a Harbor 8' Service Body with a Forklift-Loadable Rack, Class IV Receiver, and a 3-Piece Cargo Bed Enclosure. It's a great way to keep your stuff accessible and yet out of sight. Ron Sadler is the Fleet/Commercial Manager at Lehmer's Buick-GMC in Concord CA. See more at http://www.lehmersgmc.com